Talent management

Talent management
The State of Executive CompensationThe State of Executive Compensation

How has executive compensation changed during the COVID-19 crisis? 100 CIOs share their thoughts in this Pulse survey.

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What's a greater concern for returning to the office? Comment how you are prioritizing...

Top Answer : The majority of our focus is definitely on the human factors as the technical factors are mostly related to things we had to solve as we went distributed.  We will need some additional technical stuff to support the human factors (eg. scheduling software to limit the # of people in the office at the same time) but solving the human factors of helping people to feel comfortable, ensuring that safety precautions are being followed, etc... are much harder and why it will be a while before we go back.

Are you happy in your current role?

Top Answer : May I ask, why one would stay in their role if they were unhappy? How does one decide when it’s time to move on?

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Teams are becoming increasingly more global. Do you have any advice on how to manage the day-to-day of a increasingly global team?

Top Answer : Go back to the basics. Be very clear what their job descriptions are, how they contribute to the team larger team, and how they affect your larger strategy. That helps set up cohesive and well-oiled teams across the globe.

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Work From Home—Is the dream dead?

Pulse Flash Read Work from home (WFH) was the future many of us dreamed of. Then 2020 happened. WFH is no longer a choice, it’s the rule. Rules are always less fun than dreams. Google, in a move that has nothing to do with deflecting headlines away from
recent outages or employee dismissals, announced that WFH will be in place until September 2021. After this, staff will be offered the flexibility to choose their own schedule. So long as they’re in the office at least 3 days a week... And live within commuting distance... So, flexibility within certain limits then?  Jack Dorsey, in a move befitting his sartorial choices, has taken a more relaxed approach. Employees at his companies Twitter and Square will always have the option to WFH. Up in Canada, Shopify also took an early stance on this, with CEO Tobias Lutke tweeting a move to ‘digital by default’, and proclaiming ‘office centricity is over’ just a year after moving the Toronto office into very desirable real-estate. What will be the right approach once the return to the office gets the green light? WFH has some obvious benefits: no commute time spent in traffic/under someone’s armpit on public transport/sweating into your favourite shirt on the cycle in. All day sweatpants. Money saved on lunch/coffees. All the meal prepping, laundry loading and other chores that can be done in those little breaks. But for every positive there’s a flip side. It turns out the separation of work and home can be a good thing. Some are even incorporating fake commutes into their workday; a ritualistic act that, despite being circular, helps trick their brains into separating ‘work mode’ and ‘rest mode’. For others, the all-day-sweatpants phenomenon dilutes the joy of getting into sweatpants at the end of the day. WFH can be downright damaging for mental health in some situations—if homes aren’t set up to provide adequate work space, the overlap can be volatile for relationships with spouses or housemates, and lack of contact with colleagues can feel isolating. Add to that the burdens of perpetually present kids, pets and chores, and suddenly productivity seems like a futile quest; a drip feed of stress in danger of becoming chronic. That loss of compartmentalization can be negative for the organization, too. Flexi-time was a wonderful way to attract top talent. Now we’re all on perma-flexi-time, so how do companies differentiate their offerings? Facebook wants to lower employee salaries for those who go remote to lower cost-of-living areas, a move met with much scorn. Perhaps some orgs will offer higher remote salaries regardless of location? Or should employees be encouraged to expense coworking spaces on an ad hoc basis, for those working remotely but still needing a separate ‘space’? Perhaps government tax relief could even help orgs fund such initiatives? Ultimately, in business as in life, flexibility might be the key. One size fits all might simplify strategy and operations, but it probably won’t get the most out of employees. Leaders might question why they feel strongly either way—especially those situated in Silicon Valley where it might be hard to let go of the idea of in-person networking. But, seeing as we’ve all gone remote and work hasn't simply stopped in a haze of cheese puffs and Netflix, maybe we can permanently leave behind the idea that ‘work’ needs occur in a time and place in order to be considered effective. Perhaps the dream wasn’t WFH after all. All we wanted was the freedom to choose how we get our work done. And what we wear while doing it, dammit. 

What’s your view on WFH? What have you loved about it/struggled with?

Top Answer : Will be wonderful if WFH can be kept as an option. I miss going to the office and meeting people. But being able to have an option to work from home will be great as it says travel time and more productive.

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Career GoalsCareer Goals

This report was created with the goal of helping IT Executives identify and work on their personal career goals.

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What are some tips for remote hiring success? For both vetting and courting candidates...

Top Answer : Whenever possible we try to have internal references. Or at least 2 degrees of Kevin Bacon. When you have 130k employees and probably 40k contractors it works and those employees usually turn out to fit better than placement service finds And for many roles we offer a referral bonus paying after 6 months of the new employees working out ok

Leadership StyleLeadership Style

This study was conducted to help IT Executives benchmark their leadership and team management styles against their peers.

Is there going to be a mass exodus of tech workers out of cities like SF?

Top Answer : There's a mass exodus underway right now from San Francisco urban center to suburban areas. It's significant enough that rent has changed drastically. The house values in suburban areas are increasing. In some cases it's not just moving from the city to the suburb, it's moving to a different state or a different country. Countries are offering tech worker passports, where you can literally become a citizen of another country and still maintain your job somewhere else.

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How should startups respond/pivot to the pandemic?

Top Answer : There's probably some startup opportunities in the area of education. We have great universities in the greater San Francisco Bay area, Boston and elsewhere, and these do effectively manifest as sorting hats. But what they really have is great teachers and networks. There is an opportunity to extend, not just these online classes, but be able to extend that community in a meaningful way into the middle of America, and build on top of this shift. Like all education startups, it's a long road. It would take a brave investor with commitment to the founders, but I do think that this is a trend that will happen.  I also think that the way we approach IT may change. If we look at what it means to onboard an employee who's never going to physically be in the office, there's lots of supply chain relationship management problems that actually exist. The HR startups, that are frankly just web form versions of the paper processes that companies were doing, those companies that are domain experts in doing these things online, they are still burdened with heavy paper processes. I think that there are startup opportunities in the area of how do you automate these core business processes. Another area that is particularly interesting is the way we use work laptops at Google. Let's say my work laptop were to die, I would drive to the closest Google office, I would walk in. And then there's just a stack of laptops there where I come in and I badge and I walk away with a laptop and they assume the one that was unplugged when I badged was the one I took. Then I log in, they cross reference it to that, and now that laptop is associated with me and my downtime is an hour round trip. I think that there will be somebody who's successful in this area to augment the IT desktop lifecycle. If you look at fully loaded costs of an employee, there's a lot of value to be extracted, if you can compress that into a more complete solution.