Pulse

Pulse
How would you describe Pulse to your peers?  We're heading toward our next fund-raise and would love to hear the benefits of the platform and how/where it fits in your day / work. Thank you!

Top Answer : A curated community of industry experts where members can get answers to questions or access to research that is relevant *today* versus waiting for the legacy analysts to deliver reports that are myopic views of history

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Pulse Flash Read: The low-code lowdown

Is IT agile enough to move with the times? Citizen Developers wielding low-code could help. The average developer’s in-tray is perpetually stuck in the exponential, meaning that all those things business wants IT to do take a lot of time to execute. IT could always hire more developers, but they aren’t cheap, especially when budgets are already squeezed. There’s an alternative out there that not only relieves coders of some of their burden but also leverages the maker skills laying dormant in the business side of the enterprise: low-code. Business employees are often the first to identify what new tools would be useful to increase their output or reduce time wasted, and may also have a keen eye for design. The problem is expressing their ideas when they can’t speak the language of code. What if business employees could build apps without having to translate their ideas to the coders over in IT? With low-code (or no-code, more on that later), building apps, internal/external websites and landing pages can be as simple as one-click and drag-and-drop. Just as apps and personal computers enabled users to bypass the Command Line Interface that only coders can navigate and instead use Graphical User Interfaces (GUIs), low-code is bringing GUIs full circle to development processes. GUIs enable business employees to become ‘citizen developers’ (a coinage that seems a little off mark given they’re employees within the same organization, but anyway) making RAD, or Rapid App Development, an in-house process. This doesn’t mean that developers will just disappear. A developer team will (probably?) always be needed for centralized, higher-level IT infrastructure oversight for all that RAD stuff the citizen developers are creating. In fact, half of the low-code marketing is directed at developers: there’s low-code for all those mundane, time-consuming tasks that drive developers nuts, freeing them up their focus for the exciting stuff instead. Developers can let business come up with the basics of new apps, the blueprints, and then step in to add the flourishes that make a truly excellent app. They might even rediscover what sleep feels like. Trend forecasters like Gartner are predicting a rapid rise in low-code deployment, with most low-code vendors quoting Gartner’s claim that by 2024, 65% off all app development will be driven by low-code. This isn’t surprising when you think about the hitherto hidden productive power low-code can unlock from outside the IT scope. It means potentially utilizing the creative experimentation of every non-IT employee, providing lightspeed ideation-to-deployment pipelines. Someone needs a landing page? Boom, Customer Experience taken care of by an employee who knows what UI is needed. Data taking too long to move between apps? DONE, delivered by the person writing the reports, working exactly as they need it to. This is especially useful for startups and SMEs that can’t afford the top-tier developer and data scientists they’d otherwise need for deployment. Any employee can identify a process that needs automating and just… make it. Who are some of the players in the low-code/no-code sphere?
Zapier, loved by freelancers and small teams, provides intra-app automation for streamlining productivity. Mendix has landed in the upper-right ‘leaders’ part of Gartner’s Magic Quadrant for three years running, alongside, for example, OutSystems. Betty Blocks, touted as a ‘visionary’ in that same Magic Quadrant, leads more with a ‘no-code’ angle (but, given that both low-code and no-code have scope to inject code as required, it’s not clear that these are truly separate categories). Lansa, however, certainly isn’t no-code, offering a single low-code language to relieve headaches for IT and developers looking to leverage more current personnel power and app unity through integrations and deployment. All these vendors can also be described as an aPaaS - application Platform-as-a-Service, offering much in the way of security, integrations and quality control. And because why not throw in an extra acronym?

What are the low-code/no-code offerings you’ve worked with? Or is low-code just a fad and you’re sick of hearing about it?

Top Answer : and Oren Ariel would love your thoughts!

We're planning to open up the platform to go beyond IT to enable richer discussions and data. Which group of executives would you like to see on the platform next?

Top Answer : Extending to other groups of executives would only be effective if the reporting distinguishes amongst the responses from the various categories of respondents.

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How often do you access Pulse?

Top Answer : Daily

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For Pulse polls and studies, would you prefer to get:

Top Answer :

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Which channel do you respond best to?

Top Answer : MS Teams

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What part of the Pulse Executive Community do you find the most valuable to your role?

Top Answer : The core aspect of the product that still continues to resonate with me is the polls and surveys. I've also been part of the Wine and Wisdoms, and I've checked in with a bunch of people who've reviewed that. I think Pulse has done a phenomenal job of being able to curate some of that content and structure it. I think that's been well received.

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Pulse Weekly Executive Briefing: Data ManagementPulse Weekly Executive Briefing: Data Management

Pulse does weekly deep dives into new products in enterprise industry. This week, we look at Data Management with Quilt Data. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K7Law5xDnU8

When the research isn’t what you want to hear Pulse Flash Read If you don’t like the findings of your research team, what do you do? Now, it seems, we know what Google does, as evidence mounts that it ousted lead ethical AI researcher Timnit Gebru (according to Google, Gebru ‘resigned’, though Gebru’s colleagues have now publicly disputed this). Gebru’s departure centers around a research paper she co-authored. Google was not happy about the contents of that paper and asked Gebru and other researchers to retract their co-authorship of the paper (a summary of the paper has been published by MIT Technology Review). If you follow AI ethics research, you’ll be familiar with Gebru. She co-authored a paper a few years back with Joy Buolamwini; a paper that detailed findings of racial bias embedded within the data that powers facial recognition software. The paper laid the groundwork for the likes of IBM and Microsoft to eventually pause their facial recognition technology research. You would presume that by hiring a prominent AI ethicist in Gebru, who also co-founded Black in AI, Google was signalling an intent to pursue AI research that was cognizant of the ethical problems that have arisen, to ensure that its technology would not be built on similarly biased practices. Until, that is, Gebru wouldn’t stop questioning the research once she was on the payroll. It should be noted this is the second renowned AI ethics researcher to publicly find their position at Google untenable two years running, following Meredith Whittaker’s exit in 2019. We can’t be sure of the situation from the outside, but if there’s any gray area over whether an employee has been fired or not, a company probably needs to take a close look at its HR guidelines and labor laws. This has been a mess whatever the outcome. While we await further details, there are some serious questions for Google, and indeed, the wider B2B world. How often are researchers and technical teams being told to whitewash ethical or other concerns? IT leaders have told Pulse of the pressure that exists to , so what else goes on behind closed doors? Perhaps more external auditing or regulation is the solution here.   As the SaaS model becomes the norm for businesses, are we questioning the story of the data, methods or practices of business partners? These are questions that don’t just impact our work lives but also hit us on a human level. Google employees have already spoken out against the actions taken against Gebru, just as Facebook employees have spoken out against its practices in the past. Are there systems in place that allow employees to express concerns about partners? More importantly, are employees able to comfortably express ethical concerns in-house? While humans are still in charge of creating, maintaining and deciding how we use new technologies, we should keep questioning our own practices, and be open to research that warns against certain business practices. Even if the answers aren’t what the business wants to hear. What do you think of the situation? Have you experienced businesses ignoring ethical concerns?

Top Answer : A great question and one in some cases with easy answers and not so easy ones to determine what is right and what is wrong.  In the book through the moral maze.  Robert Kane says " the first of many confusions that people have about ethics concerns the value of thinking about it.  Ethical argument is not primarily directed at those who are bent on doing evil.  It is directed in the first instance not at bad people, but at good people whose convictions are being drained by intellectual and moral confusions".

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Anyone facing issues with the latest update of the pulse app for Android? The latest update is preventing answering polls or responding to questions/surveys.

Top Answer : Hi everyone, we have one known issue with our Android app and we are working on an update. Please stay tuned and our apologies for the terrible experience on our side.

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Pulse Weekly Executive Briefing: CPQPulse Weekly Executive Briefing: CPQ

Pulse does weekly deep dives into new products in enterprise industry. This week, we look at CPQ with Veloce.

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Pulse Flash Read: Lessons from the Google lawsuit

You’ve probably seen that
Google is getting sued by the DOJ for monopolizing and violating antitrust laws. 2020 is bad for all of us, but Alphabet, Google’s all-seeing umbrella corporation, started the year by pulling out of its flagship city-of-the-future utopia SideWalk Toronto, and will end it dealing with a lawsuit. Life must be tough at the top. The main reason behind the lawsuit is the fact that Google has been paying Apple billions to be the default browser presented to Apple users. Google doesn’t deny this—in a blog post, Kent Walker, SVP of Global Affairs at Google, states that it’s standard business practice:  “Yes, like countless other businesses, we pay to promote our services, just like a cereal brand might pay a supermarket to stock its products at the end of a row or on a shelf at eye level. For digital services, when you first buy a device, it has a kind of home screen “eye level shelf.” The whole blog post reads more like a resources page on Google Devs, only with added sass, complete with demonstrations of how simple it is to switch to different search engines if users so choose, along with some scary stuff thrown in about ‘phone prices would be higher if we didn’t give Apple all these dollars yadder yadder yadder.’ But hang on a second—hasn’t Apple been making a big deal about it’s privacy-first approach? Taking billions of dollars that have come via Google’s MO of selling private user data feels a little like politicians taking money from the mob for prime construction contracts. Sure, they didn’t whack anyone for the money but they’ll happily benefit from the ones who did. While Google probably does have a case for this being standard business practice, this feels more like a warning about big tech than an excuse. Because this isn’t cereal in a supermarket—this is software that guides choices everyday, for individuals and enterprises. That has society-level impacts. Tech has been thrust onto the front pages throughout the pandemic, which has come with increased public scrutiny. Cities around the globe are developing digital strategies to get a handle on the tech landscape of their jurisdiction, and to better educate the civilians whose lives are being changed by the tech companies operating within those cities. It feels like we’re moving inexorably towards the big ‘R ’— Regulation. With Regulation on the horizon, it seems like the time has come to read the room and rethink those standard practices. Because when the public becomes aware of these goings on and all they hear back is, “Well everyone’s doing it!” it doesn’t ring like reassurance.  Does the C-suite, particularly the lesser-mentioned CCO (Chief Compliance Officer), function mostly to put out fires whenever new rules get laid down across different jurisdictions? Ensure arguments are watertight when the next lawsuit comes up? Have the right PR firm in place to ghostwrite the blog post response? Or can the CXO roles function to hold up a mirror to the organization and ask is this how we should do this?  If the roadmap to regulation is a proactive process, a company is able to place that front and center of their messaging. Think of the headaches GDPR in the EU caused across the board for global businesses. Adopting a long-term strategy that anticipates aspects of the business that could be targeted by regulation might put an organization in a highly marketable position when the time comes: we didn’t just say ‘But that’s how it’s done!’ We asked, ‘What’s a better way to do this?’

Has the lawsuit made you think about your organization’s practices? Or do you think Google will come away looking more bulletproof than ever?

Top Answer :

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