Optimization

Optimization
How does the CIO role need to evolve in the next 2-4 years?

Top Answer : If you look at what's likely to happen in the next 2-4 years, I'm beginning to see an expectation for CIOs to speak the business’s language. I had a conversation recently with a pharma company that I've joined as board advisor. They said, "We invested in technology. Our CIO is part of the management team, but he always talks technology. How do I change that?" And I said, "You have to coach the person, he's not going to change just because you expect him to change. Unless you create a catalyst, it's not going to happen." Right or wrong, there are 50% of CIOs today who are very technical and 50% who have migrated to balancing technology and business. For the 50% who haven't been able to make that transition, I think organizations like Pulse, etc., need to reach out to them and give them a playbook that can help them get there.

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What are your thoughts on SaaS management platforms (SMP)?

Top Answer :

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Tool Recommendation
Why is it virtually impossible to upgrade Operational Technology (OT)?

Top Answer : Look at companies like Schneider Electric—the Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) is a huge customer of theirs but they don't want to use the updated firmware or the updated versions of it because everything's validated on a specific version. And we have the same problem in lab environments: Once we do the validation process, which is a total pain, you don't want to go through all that again. We do our best to avoid it and we end up on these laboratory information management systems that are five revs out of date. And we keep using them—that's the reality in biotech. Until we get the people to do it.

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Should merger & acquisition (M&A) initiatives be waterfall or are there ways to make them agile?

Top Answer : Because I'm an incident response guy, my view of mergers and acquisitions tends to be rather myopic. I don't know they're happening until somebody knocks on my door and says, "What do you know about X?" So it's difficult for me to figure out how to lean manage something like that because when you acquire or merge with another company, you're on a regulatory deadline and a purchase deadline more than anything else.  You still have your program with all the steps, and now you just have to determine the timeframe needed to get them all done. And will you cut corners? Or will you say, "This will be the minimum viable product (MVP) plus one"—which is a phrase I hate because when you add a Git to plus one, I've yet to see that happen. But you still have the same number of steps and you have to get them all done or somebody has to sign off on the risk.

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What’s worse: too much or too little implementation time?

Top Answer : A lot of the enterprises need to follow the startup world’s lead and just implement things without arguing about changing and customizing them first. Because 90% of the functionality will work and they can adapt to using it, rather than trying to customize it to mimic the exact way they want to do things. I've come to the conclusion that sometimes you're better off saying, "Forget your current processes. We're going to put this in. Start using it and maybe we'll go back if there's a real problem." The normal enterprise approach is to spend the first 3 months arguing over the processes and how you want to change the software to fit your processes.

What challenges have you faced when implementing various point solutions and microservices at your organization?

Top Answer : Everyone talks about microservices or APIs—everything has to be in API, has to be consumed, even streams, etc. But they don't understand the ramifications of completely deconstructing a previously monolithic app into all these various systems that must integrate with each other. Even the definition of a micro service is iffy. People say microservice, but a function is not a microservice. It's a hard problem to solve. Everyone wants to modernize and the patterns they keep hearing, which a lot of these Unicom companies have been throwing out, are microservices—6 or 12 factor apps, with kubernetes everywhere.