Business Applications

Business Applications
ERP Usage and ChallengesERP Usage and Challenges

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What are your thoughts on SaaS management platforms (SMP)?

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Do organizations implement enough data security when it comes to their SaaS products?

Top Answer : It’s difficult because for many companies, most of their customer data is sitting in SaaS platforms that they have no access to. So even if they wanted to do something with it, they couldn't. In that situation, how am I going to test Salesforce? It's got my CRM, my investor data—all my stuff is in there. And if they have a vulnerability or loophole in their code, I just don't know how I would protect myself against that.

What’s worse: too much or too little implementation time?

Top Answer : A lot of the enterprises need to follow the startup world’s lead and just implement things without arguing about changing and customizing them first. Because 90% of the functionality will work and they can adapt to using it, rather than trying to customize it to mimic the exact way they want to do things. I've come to the conclusion that sometimes you're better off saying, "Forget your current processes. We're going to put this in. Start using it and maybe we'll go back if there's a real problem." The normal enterprise approach is to spend the first 3 months arguing over the processes and how you want to change the software to fit your processes.

How do you orchestrate reasonable implementation times at your organization?

Top Answer : By setting and aligning on rationalized expectations with your stakeholders. It’s easier to build out an agile roadmap based on technical LOE, but often things like natural capacity constraints (such as critical business stakeholders are focused on quarter-end, cross-functional teams aren’t dedicated and have competing priorities, etc.) aren’t taken into consideration or anticipated up front.   I've led implementations at enterprise-sized companies and different stages and sizes of startups. The struggle is: What is the right amount of time? Salesforce is a common CRM platform used across both large enterprises and the mid-market space. There's a standard out-of-the-box functionality and the implementation timeframe for a basic execution is about the same, but the business drivers look very different. How do we approach that to make sure we're defining the right success criteria accordingly? That's the challenge in terms of setting expectations about how quickly we can bring in technology to support the business’s needs and understanding processes which will be in various stages of maturation.

What challenges have you faced when implementing various point solutions and microservices at your organization?

Top Answer : Everyone talks about microservices or APIs—everything has to be in API, has to be consumed, even streams, etc. But they don't understand the ramifications of completely deconstructing a previously monolithic app into all these various systems that must integrate with each other. Even the definition of a micro service is iffy. People say microservice, but a function is not a microservice. It's a hard problem to solve. Everyone wants to modernize and the patterns they keep hearing, which a lot of these Unicom companies have been throwing out, are microservices—6 or 12 factor apps, with kubernetes everywhere.