Technical Insights in Startups Some attributes to consider when evaluating an insight: High Value: Does it create disruptive value around which a business can be built? Defensibility: How easy is it for a competitor to substitute? Market velocity: Are customers quick to adopt innovation or are they risk-averse? Market structure: Does the market structure allow innovators to reap benefits? It’s hard to make money when selling to an oligopoly. Capital-efficiency: How much capital is required to establish and then grow a reasonable business? Technical risk: What is the risk the technology itself will not work? Scalability/Performance: Is the new solution better? Is it enough to pay for the inevitable disruption the adoption of a new technology entails? http://www.engineeringcapital.com/technical-insights-in-startups/

Top Answer : This is a very clear and well-written blog post that outlines a lot of classic 80s Porter strategy elements. I'd also recommend reading the book "7 Powers: The Foundations of Business Strategy" by Hamilton Helmer (link below). I was fortunate enough to take a month-long course taught by him and he's absolutely brilliant. https://www.amazon.com/7-Powers-Foundations-Business-Strategy/dp/0998116319

Orange Hard Drive
IT, Software
This is a very clear and well-written blog post that outlines a lot of classic 80s Porter strategy elements. I'd also recommend reading the book "7 Powers: The Foundations of Business Strategy" by Hamilton Helmer (link below). I was fortunate enough to take a month-long course taught by him and he's absolutely brilliant. https://www.amazon.com/7-Powers-Foundations-Business-Strategy/dp/0998116319
1 upvotes
Black Terminal
IT, Manufacturing
I grew up in a petrochemical engineering company starting almost right out of high school.  One of the most valuable insights I learned while trying to innovate and do new things in a very safety conscious and conservative business is plan on defending your idea and plan for contingencies.  I worked with very bright people, and they would challenge every idea, with every possible failure point.  If you could answer their concerns, and have logical contingencies, they would be on board.   Make a lot of plans, plan for contingencies but only act on fact.    If you have a great idea and can answer valid concerns you probably have a good insight, idea, invention or a better process to get something done, to get the outcome that has business impact.
1 upvotes