With returning to the office on the horizon for many, the 3-2-2 model is being touted as the new 9-5. Will your company employ this system?

The work is still going to be work from home right now. Maybe once we step into Q3 timeline, we'll have a more realistic understanding of what that model will look like. It's all in the ideation phase right now. I don't think we have anything set in stone in terms of the scenario where we would have the employees working from the office. We're thinking about the home and hub model. It’s not the 3-2-2 model.  We have offices around the US, so we had this hoteling concept in the past, but now it will be even more frequent. Employees that are hoteling don't have a dedicated desk. If there's a use case for somebody to be there in the office at least three or four days a week, then that might be a justification for us to have something like that. Otherwise, you would be working from home for the most part, but come in when there are gatherings that need some level of personal interaction. This could be all-hands meetings (we have these bimonthly right now) or gatherings that are more social in nature. It's just to get more collaboration and familiarity between people.

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The work is still going to be work from home right now. Maybe once we step into Q3 timeline, we'll have a more realistic understanding of what that model will look like. It's all in the ideation phase right now. I don't think we have anything set in stone in terms of the scenario where we would have the employees working from the office. We're thinking about the home and hub model. It’s not the 3-2-2 model.  We have offices around the US, so we had this hoteling concept in the past, but now it will be even more frequent. Employees that are hoteling don't have a dedicated desk. If there's a use case for somebody to be there in the office at least three or four days a week, then that might be a justification for us to have something like that. Otherwise, you would be working from home for the most part, but come in when there are gatherings that need some level of personal interaction. This could be all-hands meetings (we have these bimonthly right now) or gatherings that are more social in nature. It's just to get more collaboration and familiarity between people.
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Anonymous Author
As an incident response guy, I don't understand this 3-2-2 model at all because I just view those last two as two more working days till Monday. So I don't know what those last two are. The problem is that on a three-day weekend, that's when the incidents happen. In 2019, I kid you not, I had a fire every single extended weekend. I missed all the holidays.
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Anonymous Author
It's been interesting to watch strategies evolve over the last year. I think a lot of companies expected this to be short-term: take two weeks or three weeks, and we're all going to come back. Obviously, that didn't happen. Then it seemed like everyone said "Remote is the future. Everyone's going to go remote." We've been one step behind, not in a negative way, but we wanted to watch what’s going on before we actually jumped in and did something. So it's been interesting.  I don’t really know what our model is going to look like, but we do have a new office we’re opening up when it is safe to do so. As an IT person for the last 20 years, my goal has always been to make the people on the outside of the office feel just as connected as the people inside the office. We finally have the tools and technology to do that today, but are we still going to do that? When everyone goes back to the office, remote workers will probably feel twice as left out as they did before. That's the part that concerns me. We've proven that we can be successful remotely, and now it seems everybody's going to be like, "Okay, never mind. Hurry, let's go back to the office." I'm a little skeptical about how that will go.
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Anonymous Author
We're going to continue to do whatever it is that our clients do. If we're working with tech companies and they're at the office, I mean certain standards like ISO 27001 certification require a certain level of onsite time. Do I think it's going to be as extensive as it was before? No, I think the days will be shorter. I think there'll be more focused meetings and interactions. What used to be four days maybe turns into two or three days.  I have observed that the compliance team dynamics have changed. Where previously one person would dial-in or maybe fly in for the audit, now you're jumping on to a Zoom call, and the team includes two people in the Bay Area, one in Austin, one in Denver, and one in Topeka Kansas. As a result, we're now looking at a scenario where only a quarter of the people that we would be interacting with are going to be there in an office. Does it make sense to go, or should we continue to do it remotely? We start with what the standards require us to do, but then the longer term will be based on the client's capability. If they want to fly their whole compliance team in for an audit, then great, we'll support that.
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Anonymous Author
We don't know what this is going to look like when it all comes back together. Our office is basically an open space now, so we basically created an event space out of it. When people do show up, everything's on the outer edges. We do have conference rooms still, but we set up the all-hands room basically in the middle of the office. So we got the two big projectors on the wall and the screens over there. It looks a lot different than it used to. So we'll see how that goes.
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