Which is more important for a successful digital transformation: people and process, or the technology itself?

I think your ability to pivot is a people problem. And I will talk about the academic model because that's the one where I'm living today. With COVID you couldn't be in person, you had to do something else. So what were you going to do? Some outcomes were very positive from this, which is causing people to say, "Okay, how much of what we learned from having to do it this way can we carry forward?" Whereas maybe beforehand, it wasn't looked at as strategic. So, it does drive some strategic decisions, but it's the people who are able to make that pivot with speed. We're starting to come back towards in-person. We've got faculty who have become very good at teaching to zoom and they used to be good at teaching to students in a classroom. What they're actually not very good at is teaching to a room and to a zoom. It's not like they can't multi-task, they're smart people. But they've just never had to focus on doing that mixed modality. So we don't know if that's really even a good answer for our business or what the model says it would look like.

Anonymous Author
I think your ability to pivot is a people problem. And I will talk about the academic model because that's the one where I'm living today. With COVID you couldn't be in person, you had to do something else. So what were you going to do? Some outcomes were very positive from this, which is causing people to say, "Okay, how much of what we learned from having to do it this way can we carry forward?" Whereas maybe beforehand, it wasn't looked at as strategic. So, it does drive some strategic decisions, but it's the people who are able to make that pivot with speed. We're starting to come back towards in-person. We've got faculty who have become very good at teaching to zoom and they used to be good at teaching to students in a classroom. What they're actually not very good at is teaching to a room and to a zoom. It's not like they can't multi-task, they're smart people. But they've just never had to focus on doing that mixed modality. So we don't know if that's really even a good answer for our business or what the model says it would look like.
1 upvotes
Anonymous Author
There seems to be less of an investment in people than there is in technology. Because businesses are spending so much money on software, they're pulling away from investment in people. And that means there's less focus around the processes because there's this assumption that the way that these software packages have been built, they're supposed to define the way that the business is supposed to operate. Technology is the enabler, it is not the answer, it's the enabler to what the outcome is that you're trying to get. And that is a huge gap that I see today in the success of any implementation.
0 upvotes
Anonymous Author
We never seem to invest enough in the front end on any large project around the change management aspect and what it means to people. I've done numerous automation projects where I knew people weren't on board, we did it anyway, and they found a way to make the new process look as much like the old process and potentially worse.
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Anonymous Author
As with almost every project, it boils down to the people. You could give a salesperson in your organization what you believe is the best tool ever, but if they don't feel like they're going to get value out of that tool, they're not going to use it. It's just that simple.
1 upvotes
Anonymous Author
People, from the top down. Transformation is not about the technology at all, it's about building efficiencies in your business. Sometimes that will come from Technology, but it's always the people who will end up being impacted (positively or negatively).
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