Are low-code development platforms a job killer or job creator?

We're a job creator, not a job killer 100%. A lot of what QuickBase does is it empowers those people that are the subject matter experts to run processes that they need real time visibility into, processes that are important to them. It makes them more effective at their jobs. So users of applications of QuickBase are finding it's not like we're going in and saying, “Hey, replace all these people that are just filling out a form. And we're just going to turn it into robots.” This is about providing visibility, insights, and empowerment to those people that are working on processes to better serve their customers. So, in fact, what we see is those folks have the ability to get more productive. At the same time, because our platform is so easy to use and approachable, we have numerous examples of people that were non-technical and had no STEM background using this technology. Executive assistants at schools, someone who was a hostess at a restaurant, etc. Someone who was working at a cosmetics counter at one of our large customers, a global cosmetics company, she actually started building out QuickBase applications to make her counter more productive so she could sell more, make more money. She now runs all of marketing automation for that. She showed up with the solution.  If you're a professional developer and you're all into all the cool new AI stuff or whatever it is, we will have religious discussions from time to time about, you know, low code can't do X or can't do Y, and my point of view on that is that's fine. There's still tons of opportunity and innovation for those folks that are in STEM and that want to be world-class developers. There's tons of stuff for them to do. And they probably don't want to, or need to be working on the style of applications that QuickBase and other low code platforms are working on. And that's perfectly fine. The demand for digital solutions is just almost limitless. So to me, there's never an end in sight. The more we do, the more opportunity it creates. I have this kind of debate at times with people where they'll say, “well, look in the future, you're either going to be someone who's a software developer sort of building out what the world works on, or you're going to be basically unemployable and you need universal basic income.” And I think that is absolutely wrong. I think that there are so many areas where people who have deep subject matter expertise and insights in whatever business that they're working in or whatever customer relationship they're trying to improve, and you want to give them tools to be able to make that better. I think that the dynamism and the creativity that we see everyday really reinforces that. And I'll reinforce that further with an example from one of our customers at a large investment research house. They have analysts who are studying stocks and equities and companies and they write reports and send them out. For about a year, they'd try to get a development team to build the application that their group of research analysts needed using traditional tools. After spending nine months trying to get an application that that team would use, the leader decided to introduce them to QuickBase. And what he told us was, “look, it's way easier and faster for us to just teach these analysts how to use QuickBase so they can build what they want than it is for us to try and teach what they need to a bunch of developers.” I think that's in part the vision and a lot of what we see at large in this trend. I think it's one that has a lot of room left to run.

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We're a job creator, not a job killer 100%. A lot of what QuickBase does is it empowers those people that are the subject matter experts to run processes that they need real time visibility into, processes that are important to them. It makes them more effective at their jobs. So users of applications of QuickBase are finding it's not like we're going in and saying, “Hey, replace all these people that are just filling out a form. And we're just going to turn it into robots.” This is about providing visibility, insights, and empowerment to those people that are working on processes to better serve their customers. So, in fact, what we see is those folks have the ability to get more productive. At the same time, because our platform is so easy to use and approachable, we have numerous examples of people that were non-technical and had no STEM background using this technology. Executive assistants at schools, someone who was a hostess at a restaurant, etc. Someone who was working at a cosmetics counter at one of our large customers, a global cosmetics company, she actually started building out QuickBase applications to make her counter more productive so she could sell more, make more money. She now runs all of marketing automation for that. She showed up with the solution.  If you're a professional developer and you're all into all the cool new AI stuff or whatever it is, we will have religious discussions from time to time about, you know, low code can't do X or can't do Y, and my point of view on that is that's fine. There's still tons of opportunity and innovation for those folks that are in STEM and that want to be world-class developers. There's tons of stuff for them to do. And they probably don't want to, or need to be working on the style of applications that QuickBase and other low code platforms are working on. And that's perfectly fine. The demand for digital solutions is just almost limitless. So to me, there's never an end in sight. The more we do, the more opportunity it creates. I have this kind of debate at times with people where they'll say, “well, look in the future, you're either going to be someone who's a software developer sort of building out what the world works on, or you're going to be basically unemployable and you need universal basic income.” And I think that is absolutely wrong. I think that there are so many areas where people who have deep subject matter expertise and insights in whatever business that they're working in or whatever customer relationship they're trying to improve, and you want to give them tools to be able to make that better. I think that the dynamism and the creativity that we see everyday really reinforces that. And I'll reinforce that further with an example from one of our customers at a large investment research house. They have analysts who are studying stocks and equities and companies and they write reports and send them out. For about a year, they'd try to get a development team to build the application that their group of research analysts needed using traditional tools. After spending nine months trying to get an application that that team would use, the leader decided to introduce them to QuickBase. And what he told us was, “look, it's way easier and faster for us to just teach these analysts how to use QuickBase so they can build what they want than it is for us to try and teach what they need to a bunch of developers.” I think that's in part the vision and a lot of what we see at large in this trend. I think it's one that has a lot of room left to run.
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