What IT solutions for the pandemic will persist in a post-Covid world?

There are some components of our current technology posture that we'll probably keep if we ever go back to “normal,” because there have been some good learnings from it. In higher ed, student satisfaction was actually higher in some cases while we've been teaching all classes remotely. The students still complained about not being able to be with each other, but satisfaction with education delivery was higher. We'll probably have more people working from home. We in higher ed are very traditional. We have leaders who want to see people onsite and we have a lot of staff who want to come to campus and work, yet people are enjoying the fact that they don't have a hellacious LA commute and that they have a better quality of life. So I think we will see some loosening up around having to physically be here everyday 9-5. Previously it was harder to get a particular speaker for an event because they wouldn't or couldn’t come to LA. Now you can get them because you can put them through remotely. Now that we've proven to everybody that it can work, there will be future opportunities there. Almost 100% of the students wanted to come back at first, now it is closer to 40% or 50% that want to be on campus. Our students who had to travel from other locations to come in on weekends are just saying, "I'm not going to do that now." So even in some of our hybrid scenarios, it may be a class full of students and the faculty member is still remote. We're trying to work through all the iterations of what that's going to look and feel like. It may not be the core education experience, but other derivatives of it that can be done or that are served well using this type of technology may flesh themselves out as new business opportunities.

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There are some components of our current technology posture that we'll probably keep if we ever go back to “normal,” because there have been some good learnings from it. In higher ed, student satisfaction was actually higher in some cases while we've been teaching all classes remotely. The students still complained about not being able to be with each other, but satisfaction with education delivery was higher. We'll probably have more people working from home. We in higher ed are very traditional. We have leaders who want to see people onsite and we have a lot of staff who want to come to campus and work, yet people are enjoying the fact that they don't have a hellacious LA commute and that they have a better quality of life. So I think we will see some loosening up around having to physically be here everyday 9-5. Previously it was harder to get a particular speaker for an event because they wouldn't or couldn’t come to LA. Now you can get them because you can put them through remotely. Now that we've proven to everybody that it can work, there will be future opportunities there. Almost 100% of the students wanted to come back at first, now it is closer to 40% or 50% that want to be on campus. Our students who had to travel from other locations to come in on weekends are just saying, "I'm not going to do that now." So even in some of our hybrid scenarios, it may be a class full of students and the faculty member is still remote. We're trying to work through all the iterations of what that's going to look and feel like. It may not be the core education experience, but other derivatives of it that can be done or that are served well using this type of technology may flesh themselves out as new business opportunities.
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Anonymous Author
MFA, VPNs and all communications/security/provisioning for remote teams, mobile applications
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