When implementing major change initiatives and transformations, which parts of the organization resist the most and why?

Top Answer : Companies get acquired because of the product and the technology. And so, that seems to be the most easily adopted. Juniper acquired Mist because they loved the product, the technology. And so, that gets assimilated very easily into the organization because one, the engineering teams, the product teams kind of view it as a significant positive. Furthermore, your sales teams are viewing it as the next shiny object, and so they're eager to sell and position the new product.  Sales reps are happy because it helps them meet their goals and exceed their quotas. And that's what I'm the most interested in. And so, I think a lot of these organizations are a lot quicker to kind of embrace the technology, the product, and go-to-market with it. Teams that would have trouble with it are ultimately the ones that are having to deal with stuff operationally. So, where are you having to integrate? Where are you having to put the Band-Aid? Typically, that’s IT organizations, because a lot of that heavy lifting rests on them, as well as various operational teams like sales ops, marketing ops, and finance.  This makes sense, as suddenly, they’re having to deal with two of everything, right? I mean, you're suddenly dealing with maybe two Salesforce instances and two lead management systems and possibly two ERP systems. That in itself causes a significant amount of churn.  It's not just marrying the tools. It's also about, what are the different business processes, where is the synergy, and what gets adopted?  All this can bring about a significant amount of churn and needs to be done very thoughtfully in terms of, what would make the most sense for your customers, where are you headed in terms of company goals, etc.

Black Server
Software
Companies get acquired because of the product and the technology. And so, that seems to be the most easily adopted. Juniper acquired Mist because they loved the product, the technology. And so, that gets assimilated very easily into the organization because one, the engineering teams, the product teams kind of view it as a significant positive. Furthermore, your sales teams are viewing it as the next shiny object, and so they're eager to sell and position the new product.  Sales reps are happy because it helps them meet their goals and exceed their quotas. And that's what I'm the most interested in. And so, I think a lot of these organizations are a lot quicker to kind of embrace the technology, the product, and go-to-market with it. Teams that would have trouble with it are ultimately the ones that are having to deal with stuff operationally. So, where are you having to integrate? Where are you having to put the Band-Aid? Typically, that’s IT organizations, because a lot of that heavy lifting rests on them, as well as various operational teams like sales ops, marketing ops, and finance.  This makes sense, as suddenly, they’re having to deal with two of everything, right? I mean, you're suddenly dealing with maybe two Salesforce instances and two lead management systems and possibly two ERP systems. That in itself causes a significant amount of churn.  It's not just marrying the tools. It's also about, what are the different business processes, where is the synergy, and what gets adopted?  All this can bring about a significant amount of churn and needs to be done very thoughtfully in terms of, what would make the most sense for your customers, where are you headed in terms of company goals, etc.
0 upvotes
Black Processor
Construction
In my experience no two projects are equal, even in the same company. Depends on the stakeholders' interests and the way you do change management. The approach that has worked better for us is to fully involve stakeholders in the project and make it their own (along with a project success bonus proposal), so they embrace change and make it their own.
1 upvotes