I received an interesting spontaneous application, and would like to hire him. But a manager refused because we haven't yet achieved a target allowing us to increase the team size on said venture. Moreover, another officer asked me to provide insights on how hiring him would affect the tech team's roadmap and performance. How do you estimate future increased productivity/efficiency/output to justify hiring new engineers?

Talent management

There are really only two ways to accomplish this. The first would be that this individual has a unique talent that would be worth making a case for. You'd have to show how this person's skill would provide a dramatic increase in team capability. Otherwise, it's old school resource management. You'd have to have the project management and/or help desk resource management statistics to show how high your team utilization is to justify adding another resource. I actually used this in the past with telecom engineers. Adds to headcount almost never got approved in one of my old companies. My telecom manager fought me tooth and nail on tracking project hours. But when we asked for an additional engineer for a call center project that was making the company money, the data got him the engineer he wanted.

4 comments

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Pulse User

There are really only two ways to accomplish this. The first would be that this individual has a unique talent that would be worth making a case for. You'd have to show how this person's skill would provide a dramatic increase in team capability. Otherwise, it's old school resource management. You'd have to have the project management and/or help desk resource management statistics to show how high your team utilization is to justify adding another resource. I actually used this in the past with telecom engineers. Adds to headcount almost never got approved in one of my old companies. My telecom manager fought me tooth and nail on tracking project hours. But when we asked for an additional engineer for a call center project that was making the company money, the data got him the engineer he wanted.

Pulse User

Always aim to link as much as possible back to corporate goals. There are always going to shifting priorities and objectives as well as projects. In addition to what Alan has already well stated, I would add that you have to articulate your case along three key themes

  1. What operational project or processes do not get done efficiently if we don’t get the resources? To Alan’s point some simple project resource planning is absolutely fine.
  2. How much does risk to the business increase operationally or on a project?
  3. Clearly link resources to projects that are part of the larger corporate goal of the company. Most IT teams totally forget this.


Pulse User

Adding a resource in technical team is always a forecasting, it's difficult to be 100% sure about the outcomes of a hiring as we add a resource in tech team in two cases;

  1. We have major work in pipeline
  2. Completed the billing hours target and now need to increase the team.

Now, as per your question you have not completed the 2nd point as well as not sure about 1st point. Companies also do these kind of hirings to strong the bench. Basically these kind of hirings based on the following parameters;

  1. Resource is capable of doing work of more than one resource (in terms of accuracy and completion time of work)
  2. Resource is capable to increase the billing hours with existing resources (in terms of Leading team or SME)
  3. Resource is capable of doing major POC and RnD and can open the new channels in development

These are the basic parameters on which you can judge the resource and can also provide a report to your manager that why you want to hire this resource.

Pulse User

Let me first start with I'd suggest in tracking employee impact metrics going forward so that this discussion can be more data-driven in the future. But, that obviously won't help here.
So, I'd first start with a disarming statement about how we've all read "The Mythical Man-Month" and adding more Engineers doesn't always correlate to increased performance and productivity. That will show your Manager that you're being thoughtful about this hire. You then need to clearly articulate the technical and "soft" (EQ, etc...) skills that this specific candidate possesses and the areas of performance gain that you'll see both near and long term. Hiring a great Engineer will help up-level every one else's game and/or you'll quickly find out those who aren't top performers.
Hopefully this is helpful