Have you lived through any major points in tech history?

We were a biotech company and we had to send this data back and forth to these companies. The only way you could do it was, through a private connection with the payer. We could not prove to the auditors, even though we had this giant ASA, and we're like, "We promise you, we have this private V-LAN going from us to the provider and it works." At some point we finally said, "You know what? You guys don't really get technology as an auditor. What we're going to do, we're going to get a whole bunch of little ASAs." So I had racks full of tiny ASAs, I forget what the model is now, but it was the smallest one. We had one ASA per connection to each payer or insurer. That's how we did our connections. I felt really bad for the network guy, but that's the way we rolled.

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We were a biotech company and we had to send this data back and forth to these companies. The only way you could do it was, through a private connection with the payer. We could not prove to the auditors, even though we had this giant ASA, and we're like, "We promise you, we have this private V-LAN going from us to the provider and it works." At some point we finally said, "You know what? You guys don't really get technology as an auditor. What we're going to do, we're going to get a whole bunch of little ASAs." So I had racks full of tiny ASAs, I forget what the model is now, but it was the smallest one. We had one ASA per connection to each payer or insurer. That's how we did our connections. I felt really bad for the network guy, but that's the way we rolled.
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Anonymous Author
I worked at a startup where we were doing this thing that we called an extensible computing fabric. The idea was we had a data center full of servers and you would upload your image to our servers. We would take that image and we could shoot it out to any of our servers out there. If you need more capacity, we could just spin them up. If you needed less, you could spin them down and you could pay for what you use. That was back in 2000. There was no such thing as the cloud. We thought we were going to be the next big thing. Then Marc Andreessen came out with a company called LoudCloud. It was on the cover of Wired magazine, and that was that. I can go back and say, "Man, I've built data centers for a very early pre-cloud startup." Turned out it was a failed startup. Great idea, terrible timing. Missed the boat, but then again, it turns out nobody won that war. It was won by Amazon over a decade later.
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