Will the cost of data make smart cities economically feasible?

Given that you're in Las Vegas I'll tell you this, Swim predicts ahead, the four looking two minutes for every single intersection in Vegas in real time. And that information, or those predictions are streamed to customers like Uber and FedEx and so on. You know how much I get paid for that? 25 cents per intersection per month. It's not good. It may go up in time, but it's not a great business to be in and it takes enormous effort to get there and it's expensive too. And it'll take a long time to turn into a retirement fund.

Anonymous Author
Given that you're in Las Vegas I'll tell you this, Swim predicts ahead, the four looking two minutes for every single intersection in Vegas in real time. And that information, or those predictions are streamed to customers like Uber and FedEx and so on. You know how much I get paid for that? 25 cents per intersection per month. It's not good. It may go up in time, but it's not a great business to be in and it takes enormous effort to get there and it's expensive too. And it'll take a long time to turn into a retirement fund.
1 upvotes
Anonymous Author
I tried to do this previously with mobile software. Think about the number of Starbucks that there are in the U.S. and how many corners there's a Starbucks. We engaged with them to say, if we can write the code that will give you a way to redirect a person walking down the street who wants coffee, and pre-orders it off of our app and we know that the backup inside the Starbucks that they're closest to would be an extra six minutes of their wait time, we could offer you a coupon system, a reward system, an incentive, to redirect them the next half block away to the next Starbucks who has less customers in their queue and so forth and so on. And we actually got uptake on that, it was one of our first customers, they were trialing it. We collected almost $50 million in revenue in our second year.
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